Flowing Flowers

August 31, 2012

nasturtium-path This is the main alley of Monet’s garden at Giverny, as it looks right now: the nasturtiums planted in May are progressively covering the path.

They ressemble a river of flowers, and with a bit of imagination you almost see them flowing.

What for? To fill the water lily pond of the water garden, of course!

Pretty Pink Poppies

June 7, 2012

poppies-eremurus After the yellow and orange Iceland poppies, and the enormous red perennial Chinese poppies, it is now time for the lovely pink annual poppies.

Each year, when they pull the dried ones out of the ground, the gardeners scatter the seeds in the flower beds. They grow everywhere, and they turn the garden into a pink fairy for a few days.

The eremurus, also known as fox tails, create an interesting contrast with their vertical shape.

They are topped by the climbing roses, at their best in June.

Nasturtiums and Giant Flowers

September 27, 2011

grande-alley The beauty of September in Monet’s garden at Giverny lies in the bright colors displayed by giant flowers.

Pink or red huge dahlias, tall yellow helianthus, enormous purple asters, supersized yellow or brown sunflowers have now reached their final height.

In the main alley, nasturtiums flow like a river on the sloping ground, pretending to fill the pond of the water garden.

Their petals shimmer in the sunshine, just like paint on an impressionist canvas.

Nasturtiums

August 28, 2008

nasturtiums.jpg

The main alley of Monet’s garden at Giverny is invaded by nasturtiums.

Monet planted them this way, but originally, it was not on purpose.

Monet wanted to soften the straight lines of his alley by an edge of small flowers, and he planted what he thought were dwarf nasturtiums. Which appeared to be… rambling ones, and they started to creep over the gravel.

Monet liked this effect, then he repeated it intentionally every year.

It is a talent to know how to use one’s own mistakes.

Main Alley

May 23, 2008

monet-alley.jpg

Monet’s flower garden is divided by a broad alley.

 He designed the whole garden except this walk which existed when he settled into the house.

When they came to Giverny this alley was lined by spruce trees. It was dark and full of shade, what pleased Alice: she could walk out in the garden without a parasol. But Monet disliked the spruce trees because flowers would not grow in their shade.

The couple had many arguements about these trees, and it is obvious who won.

Did Alice give up, as a smart lady? Monet kept the two yew trees at the top of the way, and he cut the other ones at a four meter height. The trunks looked like columns. Monet grew climbing roses on them and between each pair of columns he had arches also with climbing roses.

The result was lovely in spring. Now, only the arches and the yew trees remain.